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Recently Created Quotes

Quotes recently added to the Goodreads catalog.

“Renuka’s words had caused aversion in Sita that day. Now she could understand Renuka’s pain. The day Rama demanded a trial by fire, the day he sent her away into the forest, Sita remembered the sand pot Renuka had made. Ahalya, Renuka, Sita—they were all victims of mistrust and humiliation.”
Volga, The Liberation of Sita
“The children were pining for their father. They were dreaming about him. Though she had brought them up like they were her very life, though they knew nothing about their father, though their father did not even know about their birth or growing up—they wanted him. Sons needed to grow up inheriting their father’s name.
She was Janaki—daughter of Mother Earth. Yet, she became Janaki—daughter of Janaka—under his care. These boys would get recognition only when they were regarded as Rama’s offspring. Rama was Dasarathi—‘of Dasaratha’—he was fond of that name, revered it and took pride in it. These children too wanted that kind of acknowledgement. It was indeed the order of the world.
But would that happen? Would Rama embrace these children? Would he give them his name? Would he acknowledge them as descendants of his family? If that did not happen, how these innocent hearts would grieve!
If Rama accepted them as his children and took them to Ayodhya, what would happen to her?
She had left her father who loved her like his own life and taken Rama’s hand.
Rama, whom she loved like her own life, had let go of her hand.
These children whom she had brought up, caring for them like her own life—would she be able to hold on to them? Should she even attempt to do that? Would they remain in her grasp even if she did? Would they not run to their father if he called them?
What did she have, other than the disgrace that Rama, bowing to public opinion, had heaped on her?
In comparison, Rama had a kingdom—which was so dear to him that he could not give it up even for her sake. Would these children give up such a kingdom for her sake? Would their kshatriya blood allow them to do that?
Sita’s mind was in turmoil.
As a mother she had no power over them. Power never fascinated her anyway. She only had love—she loved her father; she loved Rama; she loved her children. There was no desire for power in any of those relationships. She did not want it.
These children were nature’s gift to her. She had raised them like fawns. When fawns grow up, they go off into the forest, never to return.
These children too …
Sita struggled to rein in her mind.”
Volga, The Liberation of Sita
tags: name
“يجب أخيراً أن تنفضي يديك جدياً و أن تنظري إلى الأمور كما هي بدلاً من البكاء والصياح بأن الله لن يسمح بذلك!”
دوستويفسكي, الجريمة والعقاب #2
“In my opinion, the greatest obstacle to achieving our goals is our ineffectiveness due to procrastination. We all at some time or other put things off that require our immediate attention because they seem difficult, unpleasant or we’re simply not in the mood, and occupy ourselves with things that give more pleasure at the time.”
Beryl Sherman, Working Woman
“Your truth and mine are not the same.’
‘Perhaps not. As you see more of the world, you may understand the truth of my words, too.”
Volga, The Liberation of Sita
“But won’t creation come to an end if there is no bond of marriage?’
‘Why would it come to an end, Sita? Many creatures take birth and grow in this forest. They have no marital bonds, do they? There are people of different tribes whose customs are different from yours.’
‘Does that mean human beings should live like animals, uncivilized?’
‘Why do you look down upon animals, Sita? We should love animals and nature. We should worship them. We should befriend them. That’s the duty of humans. Ignoring that basic duty, you think what is written in books is civilization. Is that right? You have come to the forest from the city. Why insist so much on the civilization of the cities? Isn’t nature the best teacher?’
‘I don’t understand your words. I feel they will cause harm to women.’
‘They certainly won’t. When a child belongs to its mother, there is no harm in that. A situation where children ask their mother who their father is or where a husband asks his wife who fathered her children comes only in the lives of some women, Sita. Think of the predicament of those women, and you’ll understand my words.’
‘Just because something happened to someone, somewhere, should people remain without marrying and bear children outside wedlock? Does it happen anywhere? Is that good conduct?’ asked Sita resentfully.
‘I don’t know if it is good conduct or not—I speak of what I know. It is only through experience that one understands the truth. And whatever you understand, you tell others.”
Volga, The Liberation of Sita
“Lot of questions came up during that struggle between life and death. Are such bonds, with a husband and sons, necessary for women? I thought they were not, so I moved away from them. I am living with my art. I give the same advice to my students. I don’t make a sand pot often. I make it occasionally so that I don’t forget the fragile nature of paativratyam.’
‘Does a woman have a world other than her husband’s? Is there a higher meaning to a woman’s life than motherhood? Your experience may have been different. But to preach everyone on the basis of your experience …’
‘A woman thinks she doesn’t have a world other than that of her husband’s. True. But some day that very husband will tell her that there is no place for her in his world. Then what’s left for her? She thinks giving birth to sons is the ultimate goal of her life. But those sons become heirs to their father, and even before we realize it, they leave her hands and go under the wing of their father. They submit to his authority. Or they begin to legislate our lives. Why bear such sons? Nobody will experience this as harshly as I have. Having realized this bitter truth, isn’t it my responsibility to share it with other women? But you Brahmins give no value for my words anyway. I teach my skills to people of different tribes in this forest and give them the essence of my experience.”
Volga, The Liberation of Sita
“For months, I vacillated between life and death. In front of me—I, who had returned from the threshold of death—were three figures: of my husband, whom I had served with my thoughts, words and deeds, and my wifehood; of my son, whom I had carried for ten months, given birth to and raised, and my motherhood; and of this pot, the result of my focus and my art. All three are the same. They are shattered by the slightest cause and life hangs on a sword’s edge.”
Volga, The Liberation of Sita
“People usually know what they should do to get what they want. They just won’t do it. They won’t pay the price. Understand there is a price to be paid for achieving anything of significance. You must be willing to pay the price.” —JOHN WOODEN”
Brian H. Murray, Crushing It in Apartments and Commercial Real Estate: How a Small Investor Can Make It Big
“If they understand that their paativratyam and fidelity are like these sand pots, they will be able to live in peace.’
Sita was confused.
‘To make this pot, you need a lot of concentration. Those who did not know this thought I was making a miracle happen by virtue of my chastity, my paativratyam. Since there was no flaw in my character anyway, I let them think what they liked. Concentration can be broken at any time. The cause may be anything. In my case, a man became the cause of distraction. My husband was enraged. He believed that my paativratyam was violated by the mere act of looking at that man. A good pot is a product of many things—practice, concentration, sand, the right amount of water and so on. Sage Jamadagni was a man of great wisdom, yet he did not understand such a simple truth. But such is the wisdom of these spiritual seekers. No matter how much wisdom they earn through penance, they continue to have a dogmatic view on the paativratyam of their wives.’
Sarcasm was evident in Renuka’s voice.”
Volga, The Liberation of Sita
“That too is part of Arya Dharma, I know. To blindly carry out a father’s wish without thinking about justice or injustice. My son did the same thing. Your husband promised my son that he too would perform the same task and establish Arya Dharma among the other races in the country.”
Volga
“Devoid of Sita’s support, Rama tasted defeat for the first time in his life. By refusing to bow down to external authority, Sita had fully experienced, for the first time, the inner power of self-authority.”
Volga, The Liberation of Sita
Lisa Scottoline
“You think you’re in Connecticut, but you’re in the jungle.”
Lisa Scottoline, Most Wanted
“I agreed to the trial only for the sake of Rama, not for my own.'
‘Don’t I know that.'
‘But again … will my decision haunt me forever?’
‘Till you take decisions for Rama’s sake and not yours, it will continue to pursue you, Sita. Look at yourself. You are enduring great pain. You think you are enduring it for the sake of someone else. You think that you have performed your duty for the sake of someone else. Your courage, your self-confidence … you have surrendered everything to others. What have you saved for yourself?’
‘What is “I”, sister? Who am I?’
Ahalya smiled.
‘The greatest of sages and philosophers have spent their lifetimes in search of an answer to this question. You means you, nothing else. You are not just the wife of Rama. There is something more in you, something that is your own. No one counsels women to find out what that something more is. If men’s pride is in wealth, or valour, or education, or caste–sect, for women it lies in fidelity, motherhood. No one advises women to transcend that pride. Most often, women don’t realize that they are part of the wider world. They limit themselves to an individual, to a household, to a family’s honour. Conquering the ego becomes the goal of spirituality for men. For women, to nourish that ego and to burn themselves to ashes in it becomes the goal. Sita, try to understand who you are, what the goal of your life is. It is not easy at all. But don’t give up. You will discover the truth in the end. You have that ability. You have saved Sri Ramachandra, can’t you save yourself? Don’t grieve over what has already happened. It is all for your own good, and is part of the process of self-realization. Be happy. Observe nature and the evolution of life. Notice the continual changes in them. The forest doesn’t comprise ashrams alone. There are also people of many races in it. Observe their lives. You belong to this whole world, not just to Rama.”
Volga, The Liberation of Sita
tags: goal, i
“Because if the moral meaning and purpose of your existence as a far-left liberal rests on my suffering and victimization as a black person, then you will need me to suffer indefinitely in order to continue to cull some meaning and purpose from your life. If I reject your help on the grounds that I will not let you expropriate my agency on behalf of my life, that I will cultivate the virtues in my character that are needed to emancipate my life from the hell you imagine it to be, then I’ve annihilated your meaning here on earth. I’ve identified your moral sadism in the relief of my suffering and named the moral hypocrisy of your life. It was never about me all along. It was about your redemption. You needed me to suffer so you could gain atonement, meaning and redemption. Now that I don’t have to suffer (really, I never had to) you have no purpose for living. Your existence is void of moral meaning. I have, in essence, damned you to a living hell. These alt-left individuals have a”
Jason D. Hill, We Have Overcome: An Immigrant’s Letter to the American People
“Standing looking out to sea can be like standing at an altar. You wait in silence for some kind of benediction. If prayer could have a physical destination, this would be it”
Jean Sprackland, Strands: A Year of Discoveries on the Beach
tags: sea
“There is no better path to wisdom than experience.”
Volga, The Liberation of Sita
Debbie Macomber
“shouldn’t go unpunished. He dragged the man to the very tree where he’d chained the poor dog and wrapped the chain around him, securing him to the tree. That wouldn’t be the only penalty the drunkard would pay. Keaton knew that Preston would contact the authorities and see to it that this monster was prosecuted. That, however, would take time.”
Debbie Macomber, Cottage by the Sea
Mia Sheridan
“Sometimes the beginning of love is just a simple matter of proximity.”
Mia Sheridan, More Than Words
“Did Ahalya know it would turn out like this? Rama has asked for my chastity test. Isn’t death better than this? Isn’t leaving me to my fate better? Why humiliate me like this? Why wage such a war if this is how I was going to be treated?
War is for demonstrating the valour of men. Rama has proved his heroism. He is awaiting the demonstration of his wife’s chastity. Isn’t this what Ahalya called distrust?
Wouldn’t accepting her in trust or rejecting her in distrust be better? What should be done now? Sita’s heart was like a volcano.”
Volga, The Liberation of Sita
“What does conducting an enquiry mean, Sita? Distrust, isn’t it? Wouldn’t it be better, instead, to believe in either your innocence or guilt? … All men are the same, Sita.”
Volga, The Liberation of Sita
“That there is no truth and untruth. Is that the wisdom you gained?’ Sita asked sarcastically.
‘Truth does not remain the same forever but keeps changing continuously—that is the wisdom I earned.”
Volga, The Liberation of Sita
“but there will come a time, when you’ll look back on what used to make you sad
and you’ll laugh, because whatever was meant to destroy you will have made you a little bit stronger”
r.h.Sin
“En iyisi kırbacı havada tutmaktır, onu koşan hayvanın başına indirmek değil.”
Lev Nikolayevich Tolstoy, War and Peace
“It is difficult to bear with women who talk like me, Sita. It becomes easier if I accept that I have made a mistake. Then there is atonement for every sin. If I argue that I have not made any mistake, they will take pity on me. They will take my side, seeing me as the victim of an unjust allegation. But if I say, “Right or wrong, it’s my business, what has it to do with you? Who gave you the right or authority to judge”, then nobody will be able to tolerate it.’
‘Are you saying that even Maharshi Gautama does not have that authority?’ Sita was unable to understand Ahalya.
‘Society gave him that authority. I didn’t. Till I give it, no one can have that authority over me.’
‘But he has disowned you.’
‘Pity, that’s his loss.’
‘And you … they say you lived like a lifeless stone for years.’
‘That’s what you think. I have spent all these years thinking about my identity in this universe. I have learned how the world runs—on what morals and laws, and what their roots are. I have gained a lot of wisdom.”
Volga, The Liberation of Sita
“Whatever gives you peace of mind, consider that the truth.”
Volga, The Liberation of Sita
“I know it is difficult to understand, Sita. I don’t know why my story was told to you and how it was narrated. Indra lusted after me. Like everyone else, he too looked at women as if they are meant for men’s enjoyment. Knowing that I wouldn’t surrender to his desire, he came in the hours of darkness in the guise of my husband. Did I see through his disguise? That is the question that bothers many people in this world. But to my husband, the question was irrelevant. It was the same to him either way. His property, even if temporarily, had fallen into the hands of another. It was polluted. Pollution, cleanliness, purity, impurity, honour, dishonour—Brahmin men have invested these words with such power that there is no scope in them for truth and untruth. No distinction.”
Volga, The Liberation of Sita
Wayne W. Dyer
“Allow your life to unfold naturally. Know that it too is a vessel of perfection. Just as you breathe in and breathe out, there is a time for being ahead and a time for being behind; a time for being in motion and a time for being at rest; a time for being vigorous and a time for being exhausted; a time for being safe and a time for being in danger.”
Wayne W. Dyer, Change Your Thoughts - Change Your Life: Living the Wisdom of the Tao
“إنها كالطفل تماماً ... إن لها عقلاً مضطرباً تماماً ... من شدة الحزن”
دوستويفسكي, الجريمة والعقاب # 2
“Each one to their own truth. Does anyone in this world have the power to decide between truth and untruth?”
Volga, The Liberation of Sita
Bill Clinton
“And you hear me, you unelected flunky. I only take orders from the president. Until I hear from him, I’ll be”
Bill Clinton, The President Is Missing
“what is the truth? If there is something called truth, wouldn’t it have a meaning?”
Volga, The Liberation of Sita
Pamela Harju
“To her surprise, he took her hand and raised it to his lips. For a moment, Claire couldn’t see his face properly. When he let go of her hand and looked up at her again, there was a peculiar expression on his face. It was full of longing, and it went so deep that Claire’s heart shattered. She didn’t feel sympathy for him. It was more a case of feeling a similar yearning, and it seemed to push her heart all the way to the back of her ribcage where it was being strangled against her spine and was likely to be squeezed out of life.”
Pamela Harju, A World Other Than Her Own
“If you took a kitten away from its mother, then dumped it back again and the mother bit its throat out because it didn't smell right, you'd know that was your fault. If you caught a bird and taught it to talk, and then it escaped and it starved to death because it didn't know how to feed itself, you'd be absolutely clear that was on you.”
M. R. Carey
Pamela Harju
“It was raining outside. It wasn’t heavy, but it left droplets on the windows, making it look like the window was covered in glitter which gleamed and shone in the candlelight. There was something outlandish about the place. It wasn’t only the grand rooms and the exquisite décor and not even the sheer size of the building; there was more to it. It was a feeling. She felt enveloped in it day and night. It wasn’t unpleasant or choking, but it wasn’t cosy and welcoming either. It was just there, like a straitjacket. She hoped that there could have been a bit more glitter and glamour to her days. She wasn’t exactly a sparkly kind of girl, but she missed… something.”
Pamela Harju, A World Other Than Her Own
Jordan B. Peterson
“Every bit of learning is a little death. Every bit of new information challenges a previous conception, forcing it to dissolve into chaos before it can be reborn as something better.”
Jordan B. Peterson, 12 Rules for Life: An Antidote to Chaos
Agatha Christie
“Women are like that nowadays, never happy unless they're dancing or gambling.”
Agatha Christie, Poirot's Early Cases: 18 Hercule Poirot Mysteries
Pamela Harju
“While she sat and relaxed in her comfortable surroundings, the rain outside got heavier. It beat against the tall windows like hundreds of tapping fingers while the wind sang its own operas outside. In a strange way, it added to her contentment. She was warm and dry inside while outside Mother Nature was throwing a tantrum.”
Pamela Harju, A World Other Than Her Own
tags: nature
Pamela Harju
“Who did she expect to pick her up? A name had been on her lips. Someone she missed terribly, so much so that the physical longing stabbed at her chest and made her grab it, but there was no knife to pull out. It was invisible but real, and the blade was grinding deeper into her as she realised that she didn’t know who she was missing. There was no knight in shining armour to collect her, or if there was, she didn’t know who he was.”
Pamela Harju, A World Other Than Her Own
“And the olfactory part of a dog’s brain is forty times larger than a human’s; depending on the breed, a dog can have up to 300 million olfactory receptors in his nose, compared to about 6 million in ours. Even with that extreme superiority in equipment, dogs don’t merely smell a superstrong version of what we smell (or don’t smell); instead, they can perceive multiple layers of smell, which gives dogs a far greater range of information.”
Kay Frydenborg, A Dog in the Cave: The Wolves Who Made Us Human
Edmund White
“Charles used to say, “If God had meant boys to be fucked, he would have put a hole in their ass.”
Edmund White, The Unpunished Vice: A Life of Reading
tags: ass, fuck
Edmund White
“Later I would know some real workers—heavily tattooed, hair worn in ponytails, motorcycle-riding, manga-reading, and pill-popping—and I realized they were as batty as we were, far from the standardized robots of our fantasies. Americans, rich or poor, were a nation of weirdos.”
Edmund White, The Unpunished Vice: A Life of Reading
Edmund White
“Everything we wrote was submitted to the editors above us, grizzled Korean War pilots with buzz cuts and an encyclopedic knowledge, who would routinely bounce our copy back and demand “fixes” (“More color,” “Doesn’t track,” or simply “Huh?” written in the margin).”
Edmund White, The Unpunished Vice: A Life of Reading
James Martin
“In Ignatian spirituality nothing is hidden away; everything can be opened up as a way of finding God. “God must be found in everything,” as Nadal noted, summarizing Ignatius. When you’re in a job you enjoy, that’s easy. The work itself becomes a way to find God: the emotional, mental, and sometimes physical satisfaction that comes with the labor is a way of experiencing God’s joy and God’s desire to create alongside you. One of the main characters in the 1981 movie Chariots of Fire, about competitors in the 1924 Olympics, is a Scots minister who is also a runner. When asked why he runs, he says, “When I run, I feel [God’s] pleasure.” That’s as good a description as any about living out a vocation. The work itself is pleasurable.”
James Martin, The Jesuit Guide to (Almost) Everything: A Spirituality for Real Life
Edmund White
“In the 1950s the three most heinous things in America were heroin use, communism, and homosexuality.”
Edmund White, The Unpunished Vice: A Life of Reading
tags: 1950s
Edmund White
“Precision is easier to master than artful vagueness, especially now when, thanks to Google, novels are fact-heavy. We no longer refer to “flowers” but to particular varieties of roses. The whole valuable distinction between foreground (precise) and background (blurred) has been lost, and now everything is crowding toward the viewer, clamoring for attention.”
Edmund White, The Unpunished Vice: A Life of Reading
tags: novels
Jamie Shaw
“Yes. Deandra Dawson, will you please for the love of God be my fucking girlfriend?”
Jamie Shaw, Riot
Edmund White
“There’s something mystic and beautiful in the ineffable.”
Edmund White, The Unpunished Vice: A Life of Reading
Edmund White
“I remember Ronald Firbank once said, upon entering a bookshop, something like, “Do you have anything in my line, you know, something dreamy and vague?”
Edmund White, The Unpunished Vice: A Life of Reading
Edmund White
“When I did finally come to, I reported to Patrick that Valentino (not the dress designer but the silent movie star) had auditioned Patrick and me. At the climactic moment we had to twirl pantless, go into splits, and leave on the floor an inked impression of our anuses. Valentino had liked my impression more than Patrick’s and called me back for a second audition, which didn’t go so well.”
Edmund White, The Unpunished Vice: A Life of Reading
Edmund White
“Critics always praise precision in writing, and some great writers (Joyce, Beckett, Gustave Flaubert) are masters of clarity—but one of the great (and seldom mentioned) resources of fiction is vagueness.”
Edmund White, The Unpunished Vice: A Life of Reading
Edmund White
“When you see a book you want, buy it instantly because you may never find it again.”
Edmund White, The Unpunished Vice: A Life of Reading
tags: book
“my tolerance for bullshit
seems to diminish with age
my circle of friends made smaller
with time

i’m less likely to trust
far less open to what isn’t familiar
as even the things i know
appear less appealing

a bit more paranoid
or maybe i’m just wiser
a bit more antisocial
or possibly a little more selective

life appears differently
the more you live it
maybe i’m seeing more clearly
the older i become”
r.h.Sin
Anthea Syrokou
“She realised that he would never be sorry because he had refused to see her for who she was - and who she definitely wasn’t.”
Anthea Syrokou, True Colours
Edmund White
“There is no greater pleasure than to lie between clean sheets, listen to music, and read under a strong light.”
Edmund White, The Unpunished Vice: A Life of Reading
tags: read
Edmund White
“Someone said a writer should read three times more than he or she writes.”
Edmund White, The Unpunished Vice: A Life of Reading
tags: writer
Edmund White
“Reading books for pleasure, of course, is the greatest joy. No need to underline, press on, try out mentally summarizing or evaluating phrases. One is free to read as a child reads—no duties, no goals, no responsibilities, no clock ticking: pure rapture.”
Edmund White, The Unpunished Vice: A Life of Reading
Edmund White
“For me, as for many kids, words had a magical (and sometimes sexual) aura, and I would look up in my mother’s medical dictionary words such as penis, intercourse, or homosexuality, exciting words no matter how dispiriting the definition, exciting just because they appeared in print.”
Edmund White, The Unpunished Vice: A Life of Reading
tags: words
Edmund White
“I could certainly subscribe to the notion that life ends in old age, sickness, and death—but later, later.”
Edmund White, The Unpunished Vice: A Life of Reading
Edmund White
“As a Buddhist I was determined to root out all desires, including especially my “sick” desire for other boys and men. Only through ridding myself of all “hankerings” could I achieve nirvana and escape the endless cycle of rebirth. The odd thing is that the transmigration of the soul from one body (old and ailing) into another (a happy baby’s) didn’t sound so bad—in fact, it was what most Americans longed for.”
Edmund White, The Unpunished Vice: A Life of Reading
Edmund White
“I asked him what it was like to live in a monastery and meditate for a year. He said it was a waste of time, that he never meditated, and that the older monks were interested only in feeling up boys, playing cards, and telling fortunes, that they were a dirty, lazy, superstitious lot.”
Edmund White, The Unpunished Vice: A Life of Reading
Edmund White
“Teenagers, flooded with destabilizing hormones and a longing for elsewhere, are particularly prone to the seductive power of dark narratives.”
Edmund White, The Unpunished Vice: A Life of Reading
“A lot of people claim to believe in things. ‘Family is most important,’ but they’ll screw a fifty-dollar hooker on payday. ‘Country first,’ but they cheat on their taxes. Not you, though. You say everyone should know everything, and by God, you put your money where your mouth is.”
James S.A. Corey, Leviathan Wakes
David  Blaze
“You’re not trying to trick me again — are you, Fox?” He had distracted me in the past so he could get to the chickens.”
David Blaze, My Fox Ate My Cake
“Power wants your body softening in your chair and your emotions dissipating on the screen.”
Timothy Snyder (author), On Tyranny: Twenty Lessons from the Twentieth Century
Edmund White
Death in Venice made me hope that there might be others like me, somewhere out there, possibly in the ritzy nearby community of Charlevoix. He’d be older, rich, devoted to me and my magical youth.”
Edmund White, The Unpunished Vice: A Life of Reading
Alberto Villoldo
“It’s in bringing others the healing gifts we’ve received that the benefits of these gifts become truly ours.”
Alberto Villoldo, One Spirit Medicine: Ancient Ways to Ultimate Wellness
Edmund White
“Gide was the tutelary god of my adolescence, and I immersed myself in his work. He wasn’t a very good role model, since he made it clear that he was a pedophile, not a homosexual, and genuinely immoral.”
Edmund White, The Unpunished Vice: A Life of Reading
tags: gide
Patty Blount
“Yeah. What about electricity and utility bills?” “I don’t know, Mr. Dean. What about them?” Mr. Williams responded”
Patty Blount, Send
“Remember! Most strings are incompressible, most reals uncomputable, most theorems unprovable, most programs undecidable.”
Gwern Branwen
Sarah Gysler
“J’ai bien fait de partir, je perdais pied à force de faire du sur-place. C’est une de mes grandes théories aujourd’hui : le voyage n’est pas le plus important, la destination on s’en contrefout. Ce qui compte, c’est de rester en mouvement. Quand s’arrête, on étouffe.”
Sarah Gysler, Petite
“Let everything happen to you: beauty and terror. Just keep going. No feeling is final. —RAINER MARIA RILKE”
Henry Emmons, The Chemistry of Calm: A Powerful, Drug-Free Plan to Quiet Your Fears and Overcome Your Anxiety
Alberto Villoldo
“We have to become still in the midst of the turmoil so we can observe clearly how our actions and the actions of others, past and present, fit together in the tapestry of life. In the timeless instant when we stop moving and simply witness the moment, the dust settles and the big picture emerges.”
Alberto Villoldo, One Spirit Medicine: Ancient Ways to Ultimate Wellness
Alberto Villoldo
“We come to realize that the universe mirrors back to us perfectly our beliefs, our intentions, our sincerity. What is is the product of the map of reality you carry inside you. If you want to change your experience, you need to change the map.”
Alberto Villoldo, One Spirit Medicine: Ancient Ways to Ultimate Wellness
“Kavga eden iki kişiden ikisi de her zaman hatalıdır.”
Lev Nikolayevich Tolstoy, War and Peace
“I am the Englishwoman in New York, haha! (Silence). I shall continue insisting on tea rather than coffee.”
Nick Turner, Gedney: A Novella of East Anglia
William Faulkner
“Varner would now be again, what with a second new clerk in the store—the new clerk exactly like the old one but a little smaller, a little compacter, as if they had both been cut with the same die but in inverse order to appearance, the last first and after the edges of the die were dulled and spread a little—with his little, full, bright-pink mouth like a kitten’s button and his bright, quick, amoral eyes like a chipmunk and his air of merry and incorrigible and unflagging conviction of the inherent constant active dishonesty of all men, including himself.”
William Faulkner, Snopes: The Hamlet, The Town, The Mansion
James Martin
“When I was in elementary school, our science teacher once asked our class to visit a nearby stream and draw out a glass of water, whose contents we would bring into class to peer at under a microscope. But before we could use the microscope, said our teacher, we would need to set the glass on a windowsill overnight: the water needed to clear. Plunging a glass directly into a pond will bring up all sorts of dirt, leaves, and twigs. Even after a few hours the water will still be cloudy. But if you let it settle, things become clearer. Can you sit with yourself and let some of the dirt, leaves, and twigs of your life—your selfish wants—settle down so that things will be clearer?”
James Martin, The Jesuit Guide to (Almost) Everything: A Spirituality for Real Life
Enid Blyton
“surprise he turned and spat into the ditch. ‘That’s what I think of him!”
Enid Blyton, Five on Finniston Farm
“When you read an account in a journal you take a huge amount on trust. You have to take on trust that they did the things they said they did. And while we do always have to trust people to a degree, we don’t trust them as much as we used to.

Statistics used to be seen as analysing data, the combination of numbers. I’ve come to see that as the least important part. The difficult bit is how you design a study, collect the data, avoid bias and provide an honest representation of what you found.”
Douglas Altman
Mokokoma Mokhonoana
“Our denial of our weakness is as profitable to our opponents as our unawareness of our strength.”
Mokokoma Mokhonoana
Mokokoma Mokhonoana
“It is usually impossible to be bored while you have a serious problem.”
Mokokoma Mokhonoana
Mokokoma Mokhonoana
“Most social media users sometimes like statements they do not understand.”
Mokokoma Mokhonoana
Mokokoma Mokhonoana
“Mastery generally requires the ability to not only tolerate but also enjoy your own company.”
Mokokoma Mokhonoana
Mokokoma Mokhonoana
“Even most of those whose wealth was not inherited or won often lose sleep over losing their wealth.”
Mokokoma Mokhonoana
Mokokoma Mokhonoana
“An action is at least a billion times less difficult to choose than a reaction.”
Mokokoma Mokhonoana
Mokokoma Mokhonoana
“We are some people’s friends only when they are with us.”
Mokokoma Mokhonoana
Mokokoma Mokhonoana
“Many millions of people have lost their lives while trying to save a few minutes.”
Mokokoma Mokhonoana
James Martin
“Career tends to mean that you study for a profession that you do for the rest of your life. But for many people that’s not true any longer. In the modern sense, a career is less about a workplace, or even a specific profession, and more about how you develop your skills and talents.” What about vocation? “People tend to associate vocation with a specific work, job or career,” he said. “The Protestant reformers talked about a general calling to become holy people, and a specific calling to different kinds of ministries and work, which is more accurate.”
James Martin, The Jesuit Guide to (Almost) Everything: A Spirituality for Real Life
Mokokoma Mokhonoana
“Some people have rubbed salt into some people’s wounds by punching out their false teeth.”
Mokokoma Mokhonoana
“that the depth of knowledge required to understand what was and wasn't possible within the confines of the known universe was not within their grasp.”
Arthur Byrne, The Magellan Apocalypse: Survival Series
Mokokoma Mokhonoana
“Comfort rarely produces great art.”
Mokokoma Mokhonoana
Mokokoma Mokhonoana
“Most people are like all stomachs: they cannot remain satisfied for a long time.”
Mokokoma Mokhonoana
Mokokoma Mokhonoana
“Being loved is not a biological need.”
Mokokoma Mokhonoana
James Martin
“Vocation is different from work or a job or even a career. You could say that work is the labor required to do a task. A job is the situation in which you do it. A career is the long-term trajectory or pattern of many jobs. But vocation is deeper than each of those concepts.”
James Martin, The Jesuit Guide to (Almost) Everything: A Spirituality for Real Life
Zach Weinersmith
“we tend to share things because they convey information to other people that we would like them to know, either about us or about the world. But, in general, that isn’t what great art does.

...people who master the viral will be the ones likely to have full time careers. So, the art we get will be more and more viral, less and less good...

art becomes ever more about [merely] displaying one’s views to the observer.”
Zach Weinersmith
Val McDermid
“To come up against someone who appeared not to give a damn about exerting petty power almost restored his faith in the public.”
Val McDermid, Insidious Intent
“It sounded old. Deserve. Old and tired and beaten to death. Deserve. Now it seemed to her that she was always saying or thinking that she didn't deserve bad treatment from others. “
“Wasted time and wasted breath,
Helping people 'd be as good,
but I wouldn't, if I could.”
“And then one day I let go of all the people who did not deserve me...”
Goodbye past friends, I deserve better than this….
Damnatio memoriae”
Goodbye Childhoodstars

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